Screening Tests for Heart Disease
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Heart disease only happens to the elderly and fried food-lovers, right?
Wrong.

Unfortunately there are still common myths about heart disease. Following false assumptions can be dangerous to your cardiovascular health. There are a number of factors that can affect your heart including smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes and LDL (commonly called bad cholesterol).

Read below to gain some clarity on these common myths:

  1. “I’m young and don’t have to worry about heart disease.”
  2. “There would be warning signs if I had high blood pressure.”
  3. “This pain in my leg muscles is from aging or exercise. My heart is fine!”
  4. “Heart disease runs in my family. There is nothing I can do.”
  5. “I’m a woman. Heart disease is more common in men, so I should be fine.”
  6. “I am young and don’t need to check my cholesterol.”
  7. “I have had a heart attack and should avoid exercise”
  1. “I’m young and don’t have to worry about heart disease”

Cause and effect. Your lifestyle habits now will play out later in life. You can lower your risk for cardiovascular disease as early as childhood and adolescence. It is as this early stage in life that plaque can start to accumulate in the arteries. You do not want clogged arteries later in life. One in three Americans have cardiovascular disease. Develop a healthy life in your young age.

  1. “There would be warning signs if I had high blood pressure.”

Most people never really know if they have High blood pressure. There is a reason that it is known as the “silent killer”. You may never experience common symptoms, but your body will alert you if there is a serious problem. Don’t wait for that day. Want to know if you have high blood pressure? Simply check your numbers with a test. Avoid heart attack and other serious issues like stroke and kidney damage. Early treatment is key.

  1. “This pain in my leg muscles is from aging or exercise. My heart is fine!”

Leg pains or muscle spasms could be a sign of a condition called peripheral artery disease, or PAD. This condition results from blocked arteries which causes plaque buildup. The risk for heart attack or stroke is higher with a PAD diagnosis.

Heart disease is America’s #1 killer, but it doesn’t have to be. From nutrition to exercise, Learn what you can do to change your risk of heart attack and stroke!

Request a Meeting with Your Local Palmyra Physician

MDVIP,  has 24/7 around the clock care and a nationwide network of physicians who can meet your needs. Fee-based primary care options like MDVIP are becoming more and more affordable for seniors and long-time members. You want a doctor who is there when you need them, takes time to listen, who cares, a doctor you can trust.

  1. “Heart disease runs in my family. There is nothing I can do.”

You have a family history of heart disease? Yes, you may be at higher risk, though you can take steps to dramatically reduce your risk by as much as 75%. If you knew that you had a 75% chance to win the lottery, you would probably take action immediately to buy tickets. Create an action plan. You can keep your heart healthy by getting active, controlling your cholesterol and blood sugar, monitoring your blood pressure, and maintaining a healthy weight.

  1. “I’m a woman. Heart disease is more common in men, so I should be fine.”

If you are a woman, you are NOT at a lower risk of heart disease than men. In fact, there is an equal number of men and women with heart disease. If you are a woman, your symptoms may be less obvious. You may not feel chest pains, but you might feel nauseous of shortness of breath.

  1. “I am young and don’t need to check my cholesterol.”

Having an overly high LDL, or “bad cholesterol” particle number and having inflammation in your body is something which you can’t feel unless you got tested. Your age is irrelevant. Don’t wait until you experience a crushing pain in your chest to run to the emergency room.

  1. “I have had a heart attack and should avoid exercise”

Nothing could be farther from the truth! Get moving now. Make a plan approved just for you! The American Heart Association recommends at least 2¹/₂ hours of moderate intensive physical activity each week for overall heart health. People with chronic conditions typically find that moderate activity is still safe and beneficial, even after an incident. If you recently had an attack, you should first consult your healthcare provider to develop a physical action plan made just for you.

Watch The Short Video Below To
Learn Five More Myths About Heart Disease

Video Credit: MDVIP – Five Myths About Heart Disease

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